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State Immunization Laws for Healthcare
Workers and Patients

Immunization Administration Requirements
For State: IL

** Click on each result to read the abridged text of the state immunization law.

Patient Type Vaccine Requirement
Hospital Employees  Hepatitis B[1] Offer[84]
  Influenza[2] Offer[85]
  MMR[3] Ensure[86]
  Varicella[4] No[87]
  Pneumococcal[5] No[88]
  Medical(M),Religious(R), or Philosophical(P) Exemptions[6] No 
Hospital Inpatients  Influenza[7] No[542]
  Pneumococcal[8] No[543]
  Medical(M),Religious(R), or Philosophical(P) Exemptions[9] No 
Individual Providers' Patients  Any Immunization[10] No 
  Medical(M),Religious(R), or Philosophical(P) Exemptions[11] No 
Ambulatory Care Facilities Employees  Any Immunization[12] Offer[89]
  Medical(M),Religious(R), or Philosophical(P) Exemptions[13] No 
Ambulatory Care Facilities Patients  Any Immunization[14] No 
  Medical(M),Religious(R), or Philosophical(P) Exemptions[15] No 
Correctional Inmates and Residents  Any Immunization[16] Ensure[90]
  Medical(M),Religious(R), or Philosophical(P) Exemptions[17] No 
Developmentally Disabled Facility Residents  Any Immunization[18] Ensure[91]
  Medical(M),Religious(R), or Philosophical(P) Exemptions[19] Yes – (M)[92]
  []
[1] Does the jurisdiction require that any hospitals offer hepatitis B vaccine to any employees of the hospital, or ensure that any such employees are vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine?

[2] Does the jurisdiction require that any hospitals offer influenza vaccine to any employees of the hospital, or ensure that any such employees are vaccinated with influenza vaccine?

[3] Does the jurisdiction require that any hospitals offer measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine (or any component thereof) to any employees of the hospital, or ensure that any such employees are vaccinated with MMR vaccine?

[4] Does the jurisdiction require that any hospitals offer varicella vaccine to any employees of the hospital, or ensure that any such employees are vaccinated with varicella vaccine?

[5] Does the jurisdiction require that any hospitals offer pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine to any employees of the hospital, or ensure that any such employees are vaccinated with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine?  Top of Page

[6] If any hospitals are required to ensure that any hospital employees are vaccinated with hepatitis B, influenza, MMR, varicella or pneumococcal vaccine, does the jurisdiction provide any medical, religious or philosophical exemptions to such administration requirements?

[7] Does the jurisdiction require that any hospitals offer any inpatients of the hospital influenza vaccine, or ensure that any inpatients are vaccinated with influenza vaccine?

[8] Does the jurisdiction require that any hospitals offer any inpatients of the hospital pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, or ensure that any inpatients are vaccinated with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine?

[9] If any hospitals are required to ensure that any hospital inpatients are vaccinated with influenza or pneumococcal vaccines, does the jurisdiction provide any medical, religious or philosophical exemptions to such administration requirements?  Top of Page

[10] Does the jurisdiction require that any individual healthcare providers offer any vaccinations to any patients, or ensure that any patients are vaccinated with any vaccines?

[11] If any individual providers are required to ensure that any of their patients are vaccinated with any vaccines, does the jurisdiction provide any medical, religious or philosophical exemptions to such administration requirements?

[12] Does the jurisdiction require that any ambulatory care facilities offer any vaccinations to any employees, or ensure that any employees are vaccinated with any vaccines?

[13] If any ambulatory care facilities are required to ensure that any employees are vaccinated with any vaccines, does the jurisdiction provide any medical, religious or philosophical exemptions to such administration requirements?  Top of Page

[14] Does the jurisdiction require that any ambulatory care facilities offer any vaccinations to any patients, or ensure that any patients are vaccinated with any vaccines?

[15] If any ambulatory care facilities are required to ensure that any patients are vaccinated with any vaccines, does the jurisdiction provide for any medical, religious or philosophical exemptions to such administration requirements?

[16] Does the jurisdiction require that any correctional facilities or juvenile detention centers offer any vaccinations to any inmates or juveniles, or ensure that any inmates or juveniles are vaccinated with any vaccines?

[17] If any correctional centers or juvenile detention centers are required to ensure that any inmates or juveniles are vaccinated with any vaccines, does the jurisdiction provide for any medical, religious or philosophical exemptions to such administration requirements?  Top of Page

[18] Does the jurisdiction require that any residential facilities for the developmentally disabled or mentally retarded offer any residents any vaccinations, or ensure that any residents are vaccinated with any vaccines?

[19] If any residential facilities for the developmentally disabled or mentally retarded are required to ensure that any residents are vaccinated with any vaccines, does the jurisdiction provide for any medical, religious or philosophical exemptions to such administration requirements?

[84] For Illinois requirements, see Ill. Admin. Code tit. 56, § 350.280, incorporating the requirements of 29 CFR § 1910.1030 (relating to all occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens). 29 CFR § 1910.1030 requires employers to make available the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccine series to all employees who have occupational exposure. The employer must ensure that the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series and follow-up is made available at no cost to the employee. Additional time, place and manner requirements apply to vaccine administration. If the employee initially declines vaccination but changes their mind while still covered under the standard, the employer shall make the hepatitis B vaccine available. If a routine booster dose(s) is recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service, the dose(s) shall be made available to the employee free of charge. Note that these requirements only apply to those institutions covered under the Illinois definition of hospital, as set forth in 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/3. 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/3 defines a “hospital” as any institution, place, building, or agency, public or private, whether organized for profit or not, devoted primarily to the maintenance and operation of facilities for the diagnosis and treatment or care of 2 or more unrelated persons admitted for overnight stay or longer in order to obtain medical, including obstetric, psychiatric, and nursing, care of illness, disease, injury, infirmity, or deformity. Also, note Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 250.450. While this regulation does not specifically relate to hepatitis B vaccine, it does require more broadly each hospital to establish an employee health program that includes required immunizations. This regulation only applies to those institutions covered by the Illinois definition of hospital set forth in 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/3.

[85] For Illinois requirements, see Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 956.30 relating to “influenza vaccination”. Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 956.30 provides that beginning with the 2010 to 2011 influenza season, each health care setting shall ensure that all health care employees are offered the opportunity to receive seasonal, novel, and pandemic influenza vaccine during the influenza seasons (between September 1 and March 1 of each year), unless the vaccine is unavailable. Healthcare employees who decline vaccination for any reason shall sign a statement declining vaccination and certifying that he or she received education about the benefits of influenza vaccine. Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 956.10 defines a “health care setting” as including, among others, hospitals as defined in the Hospital Licensing Act.  Top of Page

[86] For Illinois requirements, see Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 250.1820, relating to nursery personnel. Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 250.1820 provides that evidence of prior rubella infection or rubella vaccination shall be required of nursery personnel. This regulation only applies to those institutions covered by the Illinois definition of hospital set forth in 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/3. 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/3 defines hospitals as any institution, place, building, or agency, public or private, whether organized for profit or not, devoted primarily to the maintenance and operation of facilities for the diagnosis and treatment or care of 2 or more unrelated persons admitted for overnight stay or longer in order to obtain medical, including obstetric, psychiatric, and nursing, care of illness, disease, injury, infirmity, or deformity. Also note Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 250.450. While this regulation does not specifically relate to MMR vaccine, it does require more broadly each hospital to establish an employee health program that includes required immunizations. This regulation only applies to those institutions covered by the Illinois definition of hospital set forth in 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/3.

[87] For Illinois, while no statute or regulation requires hospitals to ensure that any employees are vaccinated with varicella vaccine, note Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 250.450. While this regulation does not specifically relate to varicella vaccine, it does require more broadly each hospital to establish an employee health program that includes required immunizations. This regulation only applies to those institutions covered by the Illinois definition of hospital set forth in 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/3, which defines hospitals as any institution, place, building, or agency, public or private, whether organized for profit or not, devoted primarily to the maintenance and operation of facilities for the diagnosis and treatment or care of 2 or more unrelated persons admitted for overnight stay or longer in order to obtain medical, including obstetric, psychiatric, and nursing, care of illness, disease, injury, infirmity, or deformity.

[88] For Illinois, while no statute or regulation requires hospitals to ensure that any employees are vaccinated with pneumococcal vaccine, note Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 250.450. While this regulation does not specifically relate to pneumococcal vaccine, it does require more broadly each hospital to establish an employee health program that includes required immunizations. This regulation only applies to those institutions covered by the Illinois definition of hospital set forth in 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/3, which defines hospitals as any institution, place, building, or agency, public or private, whether organized for profit or not, devoted primarily to the maintenance and operation of facilities for the diagnosis and treatment or care of 2 or more unrelated persons admitted for overnight stay or longer in order to obtain medical, including obstetric, psychiatric, and nursing, care of illness, disease, injury, infirmity, or deformity.

[89] For Illinois requirements, see Ill. Admin. Code tit. 56, § 350.280, incorporating the requirements of 29 CFR § 1910.1030. 29 CFR § 1910.1030 requires employers to make available the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccine series to all employees who have occupational exposure. The employer must ensure that the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series and follow-up is made available at no cost to the employee. Additional time, place and manner requirements apply to vaccine administration. If the employee initially declines vaccination but changes their mind while still covered under the standard, the employer shall make the hepatitis B vaccine available. If a routine booster dose(s) is recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service, the dose(s) shall be made available to the employee free of charge.See also Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 956.30 relating to “influenza vaccination”. Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 956.30 provides that beginning with the 2010 to 2011 influenza season, each health care setting shall ensure that all health care employees are offered the opportunity to receive seasonal, novel, and pandemic influenza vaccine during the influenza seasons (between September 1 and March 1 of each year), unless the vaccine is unavailable. Healthcare employees who decline vaccination for any reason shall sign a statement declining vaccination and certifying that he or she received education about the benefits of influenza vaccine. Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77, § 956.10 defines a “health care setting” as including, among others, an ambulatory surgical treatment center, as defined in the Ambulatory Surgical Treatment Center Act, and an end stage renal disease facility, as defined in the End Stage Renal Disease Facility Act.  Top of Page

[90] For Illinois requirements, see Ill. Admin. Code tit. 20, § 415.30, requiring that each committed person shall be immunized as prescribed by the physician.

[91] For Illinois requirements, see 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 47/2-213, relating to “facilities” regulated under the ID/DD Community Care Act. 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 47/2-213 states that facilities shall annually administer or arrange for administration of a vaccination against influenza to each resident in accordance with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that are most recent to the time of vaccination unless the vaccination is medically contraindicated or the resident has refused the vaccine. Influenza vaccinations for all residents aged 65 and over shall be completed by November 30 of each year or as soon as practicable if vaccine supplies are not available before November 1. 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 47/2-213 further states that facilities shall administer or arrange for administration of a pneumococcal vaccination to each resident in accordance with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who has not received this immunization prior to or upon admission to the facility, unless the resident refuses the offer for vaccination or the vaccination is medically contraindicated. 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 47/1-113 defines a “facility” as an intermediate care facility for the developmentally disabled or a long-term care for under age 22 facility, whether operated for profit or not, which provides, through its ownership or management, personal care or nursing for 3 or more persons not related to the applicant or owner by blood or marriage. It includes intermediate care facilities for the intellectually disabled as the term is defined in Title XVIII and Title XIX of the federal Social Security Act.

[92] For Illinois, for medical exemptions to the immunization requirements of 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 45/2-213, see 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. §45/2-213, providing that immunization requirements are inapplicable where there exists a medical contraindication.

[542] For Illinois, no statute or regulation requires any hospital to ensure that any inpatients are vaccinated with influenza vaccine. Note, however, 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/6.26 relating to “immunization against influenza virus and pneumococcal disease”. 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/6.26 requires every hospital to adopt an influenza and pneumococcal immunization policy that includes, among other things, procedures for offering immunization against influenza virus when available between September 1 and April 1, and against pneumococcal disease upon admission or discharge, in accordance with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that are most recent to the time of vaccination, unless contraindicated. 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/6.26 does not explicitly require hospitals to institute these procedures once adopted; therefore, this does not constitute an “offer” requirement in the context of this database.  Top of Page

[543] For Illinois, no statute or regulation requires any hospital to ensure that any inpatients are vaccinated with pneumococcal vaccine. Note, however, 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/6.26 relating to “immunization against influenza virus and pneumococcal disease”. 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/6.26 requires every hospital to adopt an influenza and pneumococcal immunization policy that includes, among other things, procedures for offering immunization against influenza virus when available between September 1 and April 1, and against pneumococcal disease upon admission or discharge, in accordance with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that are most recent to the time of vaccination, unless contraindicated. 210 Ill. Comp. Stat. Ann. § 85/6.26 does not explicitly require hospitals to institute these procedures once adopted; therefore, this does not constitute an “offer” requirement in the context of this database.

Disclaimer: The purpose of this database is to provide researchers, policymakers, and state and local public health practitioners with descriptive information concerning state immunization-related law. No part of this legal analysis involves providing legal advice or answering specific questions of law on behalf of any person or organization.

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