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Edward W. Galligan, M.S., M.A., R.S.

Environmental Health Supervisor

Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness

Louisville, Kentucky 40202

Biography

Edward has worked for LMPHW since February 2006.  He moved to the mosquito control division as acting supervisor in November 2006 and was promoted to be an Environmental Health Supervisor in May 2007.   Edward majored in Psychology at Indiana University in Bloomington and received his BA in 1986.  He worked in various positions for a National Bank in Southern Indiana from 1987 to 1998.  Edward enrolled at Indiana State University in the spring of 1998 where he studied the ecology of grassland birds on reclaimed surface coal mines.  He received his MA from Indiana State in the summer of 2001.  He worked briefly as a volunteer for the U. S. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, and as a research technician at the University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Lab in Aiken, South Carolina.  He attended the University of Louisville and received an MS in Environmental Biology in August 2005. 

Leadership Development Opportunities

The Environmental Public Health Leadership Institute (EPHLI) has helped me become a better supervisor by introducing me a new set of leadership skills.  The program used several self assessment tools (i.e., Meyers-Briggs, Skillscope, and ChangeStyle Indicator) which revealed my natural tendencies and areas where I might improve and become a better leader.  The Individual Development Plan (IDP) was a useful tool that allowed me to focus on improving myself in those areas that were not considered strengths on the Skillscope or Meyers-Briggs.  Although EPHLI helped me to facilitate improvement through the IDP; I must remain vigilant of my natural tendencies and continue to improve in these areas to become a better leader.

 

EPHLI also taught me how to approach any problem using systems thinking.  The sections pertaining to systems thinking and organizational learning were some of the best offered during EPHLI.  The assignments, readings, and videos on systems thinking allowed me to take these ideas and apply them to my project.  I can now see that every problem does not have an easily identifiable solution.  In fact, if the actual problem is not accurately identified, any "quick fix" might exacerbate the problem. 

 

I have enjoyed the opportunity to meet the mentors, staff, presenters and all of the members of Cohort IV.  My mentor has been great.  She has been willing to provide time, advice, and guidance when requested. The staff has ensured that I made the meetings and met all the deadlines.  The presentations were often made by the expert in that field, and the tours revealed many unique public health issues.  I want to express thanks to my team (i.e., Latrice Porter-Thomas) and the rest of my Cohort for making this such an enjoyable experience.  My peers in this Cohort are true leaders in the area of Public Health.