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James P. Mazurowski, B.S. Chemical Engineering

Director

Center for Environmental Health

Livingston County Department of Health

Mt. Morris, NY 14510

Biography

Jim Mazurowski currently serves as the Director of the Center for Environmental Health at the Livingston County Department of Health in Livingston County, New York. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York.

 

He began his career as a process engineer/chemist at a metal plating facility in Maryland (helping a manufacturing facility to legally pollute the environment). After several years of process engineering and environmental management experience for a manufacturing facility, he switched careers to become an environmental consulting engineer. In 1993, he returned to his roots in New York to provide consulting engineering support to many businesses and the federal government. For three years he worked as an environmental scientist at a former nuclear fuel reprocessing facility, the first and last ever built. He was hired in 2000 as the Director of the Center for Environmental Health and acts to implement public service programs and provide regulatory agency oversight of the entities regulated by the Center.  

Leadership Development Opportunities

I would like to express a sincere gratitude for the opportunity to be a part of the Environmental Public Health Leadership Institute. This program has been a very positive experience providing numerous opportunities for personal growth. The investment made by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in this program, I have no doubt, will lead to an improvement in environmental public health practitioners nation wide.

 

Personally, I am humbled by being chosen to be part of this program and I am grateful for the time and efforts put forth by the CDC staff and EPHLI program staff to make this program such a success. Through this program we have all had opportunities for personal evaluation and improvement. We’ve been taught about many tools for problem evaluation and project implementation as well as how to successfully use those tools. We’ve been provided references and contacts to get answers to questions. And, we have met and networked with people from all over the country who really do face many of the same challenges and opportunities in our work. It becomes clear that the practice of environmental public health is not just a job; it’s the only way to live healthier.